TCU admits 11-year-old first-year student

· August 27, 2013

First-year student Carson Huey-You wants to become a quantum physicist. He scored a 1770 on the SAT, and he was co-valedictorian of his senior class.
This semester he is taking 14 hours. His class load, which includes calculus and physics, has him moving between Beasley, Bass and Winton-Scott Halls.

His mother, Claretta Huey-You, is never far away. That’s because Carson is 11 years old. He was admitted to TCU when he was 10.

Dean of Admission Ray Brown said he cannot recall ever having an applicant so young. Carson couldn’t even apply online because the software is not set to accept someone born in 2002, Brown said.

During his admission interview, Carson’s many talents were impressive. Brown said Carson spoke Mandarin Chinese, and played piano in the Admissions Center.

Prior to Carson, Brown said the youngest student to enroll at the university during his tenure was Sam Hong, who graduated in 2011 at age 17.

Carson’s parents expect him to graduate in four to five years, when he is 15 or 16. Brown said he is pleased to have Carson at the university.

“[Carson] is at a place that will genuinely care about him as a person,” Brown said.

Read full article here: http://www.tcu360.com/campus/2013/08…t-year-student

  • Moor#BpCoffins

    Niiiiiiiiccce

    Positive black news is what we want to see.

  • Shizz

    Congratulations to him but he will be in a school with no peers and no social interactions. No childhood..

  • Fdat

    Props to The lil Homie

  • lazarus

    incredible achievement, amazing

  • http://atlnightspots krodersd43

    i’m very impressed i now gotta step it up may sound simple but its true this is definitely my dream school and he got in positive news for the first time ever on this site that’s to show us that we are more than what society labels us

  • Wabbit

    We need more of this in our community

  • 1luv

    Keep spreading the positive and not the negative. Hanz I know there is positive news just like this in the black community. Just got to get the word out.

  • reefmoney

    This is positive news…but let me provide a little deterrence if i may.

    Prodigies, wunderkind, have never been good role models for other children. And quite frankly have never been good for the egos of adults (j/k)

    Question: When you watch Lebron James do a 360 dunk effortlessly does that make you think. Damn I can do that! No…you know immediately that you will never achieve that level because that is God given talent. But thats ok because basketball is an entertainment/sport. And less than .0000001 of the worlds population make a living off it.

    But when another 11 year old kid sees a prodigy graduate from high school at the same age, we are expected for that child to aspire to this ridiculous height? Because if we dont want children to aspire to it…then why is it called positive news…why are these prodigies trotted out for other children to see?

    The big problem is that HS, College, Work Force is the field that 99% of people in America will have to use to generate income and lifestyle. So this prodigy for all intents in purposes is the Lebron James of life. So its good to showcase that because this child is an outlier but its not good as an inspiration for other children of what THEY can actually ASPIRE to achieve.

    What IS inspiration…. is children who sacrifice to become better…step by excruciating step. children who can be witnessed to forgoing parties, hanging out and movies in exchange for old fashion hard work and study. And seeing those children attain Fantastic BUT REALISTIC goals are the BEST motivation for other children.

    When we were in 9th grade they had us sit in on or the 12th grade graduation and watched as the awards were handed out to the top performers. We watched the crowd go crazy, we watched the families cry, we watched the scholarship totals top out at obscene amounts. We were in awe by the top 10 performers. And when it was done our 9th grade teachers said to us, that can be you and gave out a plan on how to achieve exactly that. how each A was worth 3,000 in scholarship money. how many hours you can anticipate to study per year. what activities you should join and how that could affect your college scholarship process. it showed us the value of time because you can anticipate down to the minute when something had to be done in order for you to stay on track. This was VERY POWERFUL, this produced a good class of doctors, business men (women) and successful real estate agents by doing 1.) teaching us time management and 2.) showing us what is possible with hard work

    And the idea came from a teacher who was a prodigy himself and said that he either had a negative effect or neutral effect on inspiring his peer group as a child, because they knew that he didn’t necessarily work hard, like they would have to, to achieve his success. But he noticed that when they saw people LIKE THEM who did great things in a normal timeline they were invigorated. Which is why we naturally root for the underdog because their are more underdogs in this world than top dogs (prodigies) and we are most likely one of the underdogs

    So anytime i see a child prodigy i just imagine the child at the same age who feels like they are unworthy for not achieving the same success or close to it. or the child younger who sees the task to achieve that level as insurmountable. I ponder…….what are we really promoting? is this different from having some children being deemed prettiest in class and others just average? Is this just another form of glorified superficiality and extolling the outliers as demigods…thus given the gifted gifts for simply being born.

    Prodigies are born, but most people must become.